11/17/2015

Overweight and thinking of pregnancy?


A commentary regarding preconception and obesity was released in the Obesity Journal today. The article details how obesity during pregnancy (high intake of calorie-dense and nutritionally depleted diets) has a correlation to infant death.
In their analysis of more than 1.2 million recent pregnancies and births in Pennsylvania, the risk of infant mortality increased linearly with maternal BMI, such that the risk of infant death (infant death per 1,000 births) for a mother entering pregnancy as normal weight was 3.7 compared to 4.6 for overweight, 5.3 for obese I, 6.5 for obese II, and 7.0 for obese III.

In the article, Leanne M. Redman and Suzanne Phelan, say that the Institute of Medicine suggests that women should not gain more than 20 pounds during a pregnancy and that they should enter the pregnancy at a normal weight. The increase in weight from being pregnant, along with poor diets, can lead to health issues for the mother and also her baby. The infant could be born small or larger than normal and have a higher risk for obesity in their life.

Infants born to women who begin pregnancy with obesity [body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2] are about 40% more likely to die than infants born to normal-weight mothers


Recommendation?


Reduce excessive weight if you plan on becoming pregnant (even though 50% of pregnancies are not planned!). Eat a proper diet and find a high quality nutrition program! 80% of weight loss is your nutrition and diet.

Further reading:
You can read the entire commentary here and associated article here

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